Early Release This Friday!

Mt Blue High School

Testing

High school juniors and seniors participate in a variety of standardized tests. Tests are offered on a schedule determined by the testing agency. The standardized testing schedule is available for the upcoming school year. A brief description of each test is included alphabetically below.

ACCUPLACER

The Accuplacer is a test designed to properly place students in college-level courses. The Accuplacer is developed and administered by the College Board, the same organization that makes the SAT and AP tests. Colleges don't use the Accuplacer to decide whether to admit a student or not; instead, the test is taken by students who have already been accepted but need to be enrolled in courses of the correct difficulty level. By having students take the Accuplacer test, colleges can ensure that they're placing students in the most appropriate courses and the students won't be overwhelmed by classes that are too difficult or bored by classes that are too easy.

While the Accuplacer is most often administered by colleges to assess which level(s) of college classes students are prepared for, it is sometimes taken by high school graduates about to begin college, current high school students who want to take college-level classes, college transfer students, or college students for whom English is a second language (ESL).

AP TESTS

AP tests are a standardized way to assess knowledge of AP course material and determine whether students are qualified to test out of similar introductory courses in college. AP Tests help to ensure that students have actually learned and absorbed the information and are eligible to receive the appropriate college credit.

You can earn college credits for high AP Test scores at many schools, and your scores may also help you to place out of introductory classes. Doing well on AP tests can mean finishing college early or avoiding college classes in subjects that are repetitive for you.

ASVAB

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a timed, multiple-choice test developed by the US Department of Defense. It measures your potential for academic and occupational success in the United States Armed Forces. Recruitment officers use results to help determine an individual's suitability for particular branches of service or to identify what types of military jobs would be best suited to you based on your own individual strengths.

SAT and ACT

Many colleges require scores from the SAT or ACT tests as a part of the admissions process. Your SAT or ACT score is a key component of your college applications.

The SAT is a multiple-choice, pencil-and-paper test created and administered by the College Board. The purpose of the SAT is to measure a high school student's readiness for college, and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants. College admissions officers will review standardized test scores alongside your high school GPA, the classes you took in high school, letters of recommendation from teachers or mentors, extracurricular activities, admissions interviews, and personal essays. How important SAT scores are in the college application process varies from school to school.

Similarly, the ACT is a multiple-choice, pencil-and-paper test administered by ACT, Inc. The purpose of the ACT test is to measure a high school student's readiness for college, and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants. College admissions officers will review standardized test scores alongside your high school GPA, the classes you took in high school, letters of recommendation from teachers or mentors, extracurricular activities, admissions interviews, and personal essays. How important ACT scores are in the college application process varies from school to school.

Maine's Comprehensive Assessment System requires that all high school juniors take the SAT during the spring of their junior year.